Tesla Recalls Charging Adapters

Palo Alto, Calif. – Dec. 13, 2016 – In response to an overheating issue, Tesla has announced the recall of a small number of charging adapter connectors commonly used by owners of the Model S or X.

The Defect

Tesla announced on its website that the recall will affect about 2,000 NEMA 14-30, 10-30 and 6-50 adapters due to the possibility of overheating. This was in response to two separate customer complaints of overheating, which Tesla claimed did not result in injury or property damage. The recall was taken “out of an abundance of caution,” according to the post on the company website.

The company noted that the affected adapters are not standard pieces of equipment that come with every vehicle, but are instead sold separately to those who want to connect their charging cables to 240-volt outlets.

Timeline of Events

January 2015 – Tesla stopped selling NEMA 14-30 adapters.

August 2016 – Tesla re-released the NEMA 14-30 adapter due to increased demand.

November 2016 – Two customers reported NEMA 14-30 adapters overheating during use, prompting the recall. The recall also affected the 10-30 and 6-50 adapters, as they share some elements with the 14-30. No incidents involving those two models have been reported, according to Tesla.

Resolution

Users of the NEMA 14-30 can expect to receive a replacement from Tesla within the next few weeks. Users of the 10-30 and 6-50 may have to wait about three months for the company to develop and manufacture alternatives. However, Tesla told customers that since these two models have not exhibited any problems, they may be used to charge vehicles if no other option is available.

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Tesla Recalls Model X Vehicles

Palo Alto, CA — May 12, 2016 — Weak seating in around 2,700 Model X vehicles have led to a Tesla recall. According to Forbes, the affected vehicles contain lackluster seats that could fold in on themselves in the event of a crash.

This represents a possible safety risk, so the company is conducting a voluntary action to address the problem quickly. The source adds that Tesla hopes to complete the recall-related repairs within five weeks, during which time vehicle owners should avoid using their third row seats. The recall will address Model X vehicles that were specifically built before March 26.

The Los Angeles Times published part of the email sent to Model X owners regarding the issue and what the manufacturer has done about it so far.

“We are emailing to inform you of a proactive action Tesla is taking to ensure your safety as a Model X owner,” the message reportedly says. “Tesla’s internally conducted crash testing demonstrates that Model X will be the first SUV to receive the highest safety rating in every category, and we are committed to ensuring that it remains the safest SUV in the world.”

The Times also quoted Tesla’s sales head John McNeil, who said that there were no reported issues connected to his company’s vehicles. He stressed the voluntary nature of the recalls, intended to show the business’ interest in better safety.

A pair of complaints listed with the National Highway Traffic safety Administration noted other issues related to the 2016 Model X, particularly claims of “faulty latches” that allow the doors to spring open unexpectedly. One complaint filed on March 17 lists “rear seats not in place” as one of many problems, such as a depression in the rear seat.

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Tesla Motors Recalls Model S Sedan

Fremont, CA – December 15, 2015 – Although no related injuries have yet been reported, Tesla Motors is spearheading an all-encompassing recall for every Model S sedan due to a faulty seat belt. Owners will be able to schedule a repair appointment to fix possible seat belt problems.

This voluntary action concerns 90,000 vehicles and is the largest Tesla Motors recall so far, according to USA Today. As of November 20, Tesla’s investigations had only discovered one vehicle with seat belt issues, the model in Europe that sparked concerns over these systems in the first place. Owners were notified via email earlier this month.

Owners could also test for the problem themselves by pulling lap portions of seatbelts with at least 80 pounds of force, although this isn’t a substitute for an official inspection, the source said. This inspection is expected to only take six minutes.

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Sean ReyesTesla Motors Recalls Model S Sedan