Toyota and Subaru Recall More Than 400,000 Vehicles Over Engine Issue

Toyota and Subaru Recall More Than 400,000 Vehicles Over Engine Issue

Automakers Subaru and Toyota Motor Corp. are recalling more than 400,000 vehicles because of a valve spring problem that could stall engines and heighten the risk of accidents.

Subaru models including the Forester, Impreza, and BRZ, manufactured between January 2012 and September 2013, are included in the recall. Also included are the Subaru-manufactured Toyota 86 sports cars, called the Scion FR-S during the years included in the recall, according to Newsweek.

Valve springs keep engine valves closed during the fuel combustion process. Subaru has said repairs on the valves could take over 12 hours per vehicle.

On Thursday, Toyota issued an entirely separate recall on its Scion xA vehicles. The company is recalling about 17,000 Scion xA vehicles made between 2004 and 2006 due to an issue with the airbag and its electrical system. An electrical shortage could either deactivate or deploy the airbag system. To avoid any airbag-related issues or accidents, owners of the recalled vehicles are encouraged to contact a Toyota dealer, where they can have the airbag replaced free of charge…Read more on Fortune.com

Sean ReyesToyota and Subaru Recall More Than 400,000 Vehicles Over Engine Issue

The road ahead for automotive recall legislation

Automotive recall legislation has been largely consistent for years, but things might be moving in a different direction. From the impact that technology is having on every single portion of the automotive industry, to the changing face of the government, a lot is yet to be decided with respect to the fate of laws and regulations that govern recalls and protect citizens.
One of the biggest currently impending changes has to do with self-driving cars, which is raising some questions with respect to the potential leader of the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration.
New face of the NHTSA?
The Detroit News recently reported that Heidi King, President Donald Trump’s nominee for the NHTSA top position, was grilled about the Takata airbag issue in her nomination hearing in front of the U.S. Senate. This particular hearing was overseen by the U.S. Senate Commerce, Science and Transportation Committee, with members asking King why the recall of those airbags was so messy.
King has been the NHTSA’s deputy administrator for months, and was put in charge of handling that particular recall, the publication noted. At the same time, there is no clear sign that the issue has been entirely resolved.
“A report done by the minority staff on this committee issued just last Friday shows that there are still 1.3 million vehicles out there with those defective Takata air bags, which is nothing more than a ticking time bomb,” Florida Senator Bill Nelson stated at the hearing, according to The Detroit News. “Just in the state of Florida, three people are dead. Eighty-three people are injured. And that’s just one state.”
King told the committee that she is working with each automotive manufacturer to resolve this issue in a more strategic and concerted fashion. At the time of this article, King has still not been admitted into the position, but no matter who emerges as the leader, changes are sure to come.
The driverless car dilemma
Autonomous vehicles are increasingly popular and have made headlines of late for their involvement in crashes. As such, whoever is ultimately in control of the NHTSA will need to oversee relatively massive overhauls to legislation to ensure that consumers are protected, especially when various parts are defective.
For example, Wired reported the car crash that ended in a fatality involving a Tesla occurred when the car’s “autopilot” feature was turned on. Other crashes involving Uber, Google and other players in the space have increased concerns. Although investigations are still taking place in all of these cases, companies themselves have taken somewhat drastic measures to eliminate the risk of another deadly or harmful accident.
At the same time, self-driving car dangers and problems have been largely overseen by their various manufacturers rather than hard-and-fast legislative frameworks. Considering that these automobiles are expected to take off far more quickly in the coming years, modernized legislation, especially recall protocols and rules, may need to be prioritized going forward.
Sean ReyesThe road ahead for automotive recall legislation

Porsche 918 Spyder Recalled For Crash Risk

CarBuzz.com – May 7, 2018

Porsche 918 Spyder Recalled For Crash Risk

Porsche has just issued a recall for all 305 examples of the company’s legendary 918 hybrid supercar that reside in the United States due to a potential manufacturing defect with the connecting shafts, which could cause the suspension control arms to crack. The voluntary recall comes as a result of rear suspension components that could crack over time, which will adversely affect the car’s handling. The issue is believed to be one of longevity and the recall was born from precaution, not outright necessity…

Read more on the CarBuzz.com website

Sean ReyesPorsche 918 Spyder Recalled For Crash Risk