Tesla Recalls Certain Model S Vehicles as Part of Takata Air Bag Recall

 

Laguna Hills, Calif. – January 27, 2019 – Tesla is recalling close to 14,000 Model S vehicles as part of the global Takata air bag recall. Affected vehicles are part of a worldwide recall that impacted millions of vehicles from different manufacturers. The recall involves Model S cars manufactured between February 2014 and December 2016, according to TechCrunch, but does not affect the Roadster, Model X, Model 3, or later Model S vehicles.

The Defect

The Takata air bag inflators in question contain a propellant material that can decompose over time, leading to risk of explosion on impact and flying shards of debris. The explosion of an air bag and resulting impact of debris could cause serious injury or death to a driver or passenger. The recall has been ongoing and is taking place worldwide.

Timeline of Events

According to Tesla, the company has been adhering to a schedule previously determined by the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA). The recall of the front passenger air bags in 2012 Model S vehicles, which began in January 2017, has now been extended to 2013 Model S vehicles in January 2018, and is also being extended to 2014-2016 Model S vehicles in January 2019.

Tesla remedied nearly 90 percent of all affected 2012 and 2013 Model S vehicles within one year after announcing its recall, and is now moving on to address the 2014-2016 models. Tesla has stated that owners do not need to be concerned if they have not been contacted yet: There is a schedule set in place for notifications to keep repairs moving smoothly, and most vehicles are not in the range of danger yet, as the air bags only become dangerous after a certain amount of time has passed since their manufacture.

The Solution

Tesla is currently continuing to contact customers to complete their air bag replacements. Owners of 2012-2013 Model S vehicles who have not yet received this replacement should schedule a service appointment. For 2014-2016 Model S, replacement parts are expected to be available by the spring of 2019, and Tesla will contact owners when the parts are ready.

Tesla is encouraging the use of their Mobile Service for customers to have the airbag replaced in the convenience of their home, office or other location. Owners may also contact the NHTSA Vehicle Safety Hotline at 1-888-327-4236 (TTY 1-800-424-9153), or go to www.safercar.gov.

Sean ReyesTesla Recalls Certain Model S Vehicles as Part of Takata Air Bag Recall

Tesla Recalls 123,000 Model S Sedans Over Faulty Bolts

The Drive – March 30, 2018

Tesla Recalls 123,000 Model S Sedans Over Faulty Bolts

Tesla is hurting after a solid few weeks of bad luck. The California-based electric car manufacturer has had slipping stocks, production delays for the Model 3, and now has issued a voluntary recall on 123,000 Model S sedans after finding that an issue with bolts may adversely affect power steering on the cars…

Read the entire article on the The Drive website

Sean ReyesTesla Recalls 123,000 Model S Sedans Over Faulty Bolts

Tesla recalls SUVs with defective rear seats

Recall Masters – October 13, 2017

Tesla recalls SUVs with defective rear seats

Tesla Inc. has recalled approximately 11,000 vehicles with defective backseat assemblies, The Associated Press reported. The campaign affects 2017 Tesla Model X sport utility vehicles with production dates ranging from Oct. 28, 2016 to Aug. 16, 2017. The automaker suspects 3 percent of the vehicles referenced in the recall contain the defective components.

The Defect

Affected models are equipped with backseat assemblies with improperly installed seat cables. These fixtures prevent the left seat from locking when upright, which poses a serious safety hazard, as the seat may move forward suddenly during a collision. However, Tesla has yet to receive field reports connecting the defect to any accidents or injuries…

Read the entire article on the Recall Masters website

Sean ReyesTesla recalls SUVs with defective rear seats

Tesla recalls SUVs with defective rear seats

 

Palo Alto, Calif. – Oct. 13, 2017 – Tesla Inc. has recalled approximately 11,000 vehicles with defective backseat assemblies, The Associated Press reported. The campaign affects 2017 Tesla Model X sport utility vehicles with production dates ranging from Oct. 28, 2016 to Aug. 16, 2017. The automaker suspects 3 percent of the vehicles referenced in the recall contain the defective components.

The Defect

Affected models are equipped with backseat assemblies with improperly installed seat cables. These fixtures prevent the left seat from locking when upright, which poses a serious safety hazard, as the seat may move forward suddenly during a collision. However, Tesla has yet to receive field reports connecting the defect to any accidents or injuries.

Timeline of Events

The automaker discovered the defect during recent internal testing, TechCrunch reported. Tesla launched a voluntary safety recall as a result.

The Solution

The car company has directed dealers to replace the seat cables in affected models free of charge. Owners received notification via email Oct. 12. Those with vehicles included in the recall will be able to schedule service via the Tesla mobile application, which the automaker has employed to great effect recently.

“In the past two months, we have conducted roughly 40 percent of the Takata air bag recall repairs via mobile service, and customer satisfaction results for our mobile service offering are consistently above 97 percent,” a Tesla spokesperson told TechCrunch.

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Tesla voluntarily recalls around 53K 2016 Model S and Model X vehicles

Tech Crunch – April 20, 2017


Tesla voluntarily recalls around 53K 2016 Model S and Model X vehicles

Tesla is issuing a voluntary recall for Model S and Model X vehicles made between February 2016 and October 2016, for a potential manufacturing issue in which the parking brake, once engaged, might experience a fractured internal gear that results in it being stuck in the ‘on’ position.

Tesla stresses that this recall is being done only because the carmaker typically exercises an abundance of caution in these cases, and that only a small number of vehicles will likely ever exhibit the issue, and that even when they do, the resulting problems don’t present a safety risk to either drivers or passengers.

The problem came to light because Tesla found customers were getting alerts that said their parking brake needs service, or that the brake could not be disengaged, not in huge numbers but with noteworthy frequency. Tesla traced the problem back to a batch of brakes from supplier Brembo installed on cars made during the roughly ten month period covered by the recall…

Read the entire article on the Tech Crunch website

Sean ReyesTesla voluntarily recalls around 53K 2016 Model S and Model X vehicles

Father of Woman Who Died in Tesla Crash Warns of Dangerous Lithium Batteries

The Daily Mail – February 12, 2017


Father of Woman Who Died in Tesla Crash Warns of Dangerous Lithium Batteries

The father of a young bride-to-be has spoken out about his daughter’s horrific death after the Tesla car she was driving crashed and burst into flames.

Casey Speckman, 27, was drunk-driving when the Model S Tesla carrying her and boss Kevin McCarthy, 44, smashed into a tree and exploded in Indianapolis on November 10.

But her father, Jon Speckman, says that she would have survived the crash if her car wasn’t powered by lithium batteries – the same as those found in the exploding Galaxy Note 7 and hoverboard devces – the IndyStar reported.…read the full article on the Daily Mail website…

Read the entire article on the Daily Mail website

Sean ReyesFather of Woman Who Died in Tesla Crash Warns of Dangerous Lithium Batteries

Will Tesla Change How the NHTSA Conducts Future Recalls?

Palo Alto, Calif. – Feb. 01, 2017 – The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration ended its six-month investigation into Tesla’s Autopilot system last week, finding no specific flaw in the technology that would spur action, according to Forbes.

This, in itself, was not a surprising story. The NHTSA will regularly close investigations without ordering a recall, depending on the specific nature of the defect, the risks associated with it and the possibility of repair. What was surprising, however, was what Tesla did in response.

Business Insider reported that in the middle of the investigation, Tesla released a software update that made some important changes to the Autopilot system – and which some say may have been enough to prevent the entire ordeal in the first place. While this may be reassuring to Tesla owners, some government officials think that there might be potential to build these kids of fixes into the recall process down the line.

Background

In May 2016, a Tesla Model S driver in Florida was killed while using the Autopilot feature. Reports of the incident released in July revealed that the driver had collided with a truck that made a left turn in front of the Tesla. The Model S passed under the truck before driving off the road.

The car’s Autopilot feature, which had been introduced in October 2015, was supposed to keep the car on the road and avoid vehicles and other obstacles. However, the program was still quite new, and had been in a public beta phase. In a blog post released after the incident, Tesla noted that the system requires drivers to keep their hands on the steering wheel at all times, and to be prepared to take full control at any time. In addition, Business Insider reported that the system is not cross-traffic aware and is primarily built to avoid rear-end collisions.

The problem in the May accident, Tesla found, was that the Autopilot system failed to sense the truck’s white tractor trailer due to the bright light conditions during the clear day. Even so, the company insisted that it was only the particular height of the trailer and the angle of impact that led to the driver’s death. Tesla argued that if the collision had occurred at the front or rear of the trailer, the vehicle’s safety features could have been more effective.

The Future of Recalls

The software update that Tesla provided to its Autopilot system makes an important changes. Drivers will no longer be able to ignore messages to keep their hands on the wheel at all times – the system will lock them out if they don’t comply. Recently, Tesla CEO Elon Musk told Autoblog that he thinks this change could have prevented the accident.

While the NHTSA does not consider this update to be a full remedy, it does believe that some of its concerns have been addressed, according to Business Insider. In addition, NHTSA spokesperson Bryan Thomas told the news source that over-the-air updates may one day change the recall process if simple software changes are quicker and more cost-effective than physical recalls.

“These are questions the agency will have to deal with in the future, but we would very much like to move quickly toward that future,” Thomas said. He added that there may come a day when automakers no longer have to mail notifications to owners.

As the agency works on developing the Federal Automated Vehicles Policy, Thomas added that these questions will have to be answered.

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NHTSA Closes Tesla Autopilot Investigation

Palo Alto, Calif. – Jan. 25, 2017 – Following the death of a Tesla Model S driver who collided with a truck in Florida last May while using the car’s autopilot feature, the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration opened an investigation into Tesla’s autopilot program to evaluate its safety. Now, in a recent announcement, the NHTSA has said that it will close the probe and not demand a recall.

Reuters reported that the driver of the Tesla had set his cruise control at 74 miles per hour two minutes before the fatal crash, and did not apply the brakes during the accident. Further investigation of the incident indicated that the Tesla had indeed been in autopilot mode at the time, but the system did not indicate that a crash was imminent. This was the first known death that occurred during the operation of a self-driving vehicle system.

In its report, the NHTSA concluded that it “did not identify any defects” with the autopilot system, which Tesla has always maintained is still in its experimental phase. The agency added that the system was not designed to react to every possible collision scenario.

In the months following the incident, Tesla introduced a number of safety updates to the Model S, according to Autoblog. For instance, it created a lockout feature that disables autopilot if drivers don’t keep their hands on the wheel for a period of time. The purpose is to encourage drivers to remain alert, even when they are letting their cars do most of the driving.

The NHTSA report added that Tesla’s vehicle crash rate dropped by 40 percent after these updates were installed.

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Tesla Recalls Charging Adapters

Palo Alto, Calif. – Dec. 13, 2016 – In response to an overheating issue, Tesla has announced the recall of a small number of charging adapter connectors commonly used by owners of the Model S or X.

The Defect

Tesla announced on its website that the recall will affect about 2,000 NEMA 14-30, 10-30 and 6-50 adapters due to the possibility of overheating. This was in response to two separate customer complaints of overheating, which Tesla claimed did not result in injury or property damage. The recall was taken “out of an abundance of caution,” according to the post on the company website.

The company noted that the affected adapters are not standard pieces of equipment that come with every vehicle, but are instead sold separately to those who want to connect their charging cables to 240-volt outlets.

Timeline of Events

January 2015 – Tesla stopped selling NEMA 14-30 adapters.

August 2016 – Tesla re-released the NEMA 14-30 adapter due to increased demand.

November 2016 – Two customers reported NEMA 14-30 adapters overheating during use, prompting the recall. The recall also affected the 10-30 and 6-50 adapters, as they share some elements with the 14-30. No incidents involving those two models have been reported, according to Tesla.

Resolution

Users of the NEMA 14-30 can expect to receive a replacement from Tesla within the next few weeks. Users of the 10-30 and 6-50 may have to wait about three months for the company to develop and manufacture alternatives. However, Tesla told customers that since these two models have not exhibited any problems, they may be used to charge vehicles if no other option is available.

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