Jaguar Land Rover recalls Range Rover SUVs over faulty seat belts

Mahwah, NJ – April 23, 2022 – Tata Motors, which owns Jaguar Land Rover (NYSE:TTM) has issued a recall for 14,812 vehicles due to a problem with the seat belts emergency locking retractor — the device that locks the seat belt in place when the vehicle crashes or slows suddenly. This increases the risk of injury.

This is at least the second recall for these issues since 2019 and includes the following models:

  • 2016 Range Rover
  • 2017 Range Rover
  • 2016 Range Rover Sport
  • 2017 Range Rover Sport

Recall summary

A seat belt prevents the occupants from being thrown or hitting any part of the vehicle in the event of a crash or sudden deceleration — significantly reducing the chance of serious injury or death.

A feature called an emergency locking retractor (ELR) allows the seat belt to freely extend and retract under normal movement, with the excess seat belt webbing wrapping around a spool. If the belt is suddenly yanked, such as in a crash, the ELR automatically locks, preventing occupants from hitting their heads against the windshield or dashboard.

In the recalled vehicles, the seat belt retractor on the driver’s seat may fail to lock at the appropriate level of force, which means that the driver may not be properly restrained in an emergency.

Recall risks

The driver may be thrown against the windshield or the steering wheel or otherwise be hurt in a crash if the seat belt is not working properly.

Other Jaguar Land Rover recalls

Tata Motors recalled more than 18,000 Range Rover Evoque SUVs in February due to other problems with the restraint system, as reported.

In September 2021, a recall was also issued for multiple Jaguar Land Rover models over another retractor problem, which could result in injuries to child occupants in the event of a crash.  

There was another recall for the same issue in May 2019 but not all the recalled received the remedy offered under this recall.

The repair

Dealers will inspect the seat belt assembly on the driver’s side and replace any defective components. Repairs will be performed free of charge.

Affected owners will be notified by June 3, 2022.

Is your vehicle part of this recall?

More than 14,000 vehicles are included in this Jaguar Land Rover recall. To see if your Land Rover is one of them,  use MotorSafety’s free vehicle lookup tool.

Joseph EstabilloJaguar Land Rover recalls Range Rover SUVs over faulty seat belts

Jaguar Land Rover recalls vehicles with faulty airbag system

Mahwah, NJ – February 26, 2022 – Tata Motors (NYSE:TTM), which owns Jaguar Land Rover, has recalled 18,824 vehicles due to a defect that causes the driver airbag system to malfunction. This increases the risk of an injury in the event of a crash.

The recall includes 2020 Land Rover Range Rover Evoque SUVs.

Recall summary

Due to a programming error, the supplemental restraint system (SRS) of the vehicles included in this Land Rover recall, which is the computer that controls the airbags, is “overly sensitive.” This means that it may turn the airbag warning light on unnecessarily, even in cases where the airbag is not faulty.

Recall risks

An SRS warning light that falsely illuminates could prevent the detection of an actual airbag system failure. This increases the risk of injury in the event of a crash. Fortunately, Jaguar Land Rover has not recorded any accidents, injuries or fires caused by this issue yet.

Other Jaguar recalls

In September 2021, Jaguar issued a recall over child seats. The Range Rover seatbelt locking system was discovered to be faulty and potentially unable to securely hold a child car seat. 

There was a Range Rover Evoque recall for the 2020 model-year in March of last year due to an airbag issue that could fail to protect the driver in the event of a crash.

Prior to that, the 2020 Range Rover Evoque was recalled because of the risk posed by the front seats’ material. The material was confirmed to burn relatively quickly, ultimately increasing the chances of an injury during a fire.

Repair

To address this concern, a software update will be performed at no cost to the owners. Owners can expect to receive communication regarding the repair program by April 14, 2022.

Is your vehicle part of this recall?

Close to 20,000 Jaguar Land Rover vehicles are included in this recall. To see if your vehicle is one of them, use MotorSafety’s free vehicle lookup tool.

Senamile NkosiJaguar Land Rover recalls vehicles with faulty airbag system

New Jaguars recalled over unsecured child car seats

Mahwah, NJ – September 26, 2021 – Tata Motors (NYSE:TTM), which owns Jaguar Land Rover, has recalled 9,000 vehicles with faulty seat belts that may not securely hold children’s car seats. The recall includes:

  • 2020 – 2021 Jaguar F- Pace SUVs
  • 2021 – 2022 Jaguar F- Type sports cars
  • 2021 Jaguar XF luxury cars

The faulty component in this recall is the seat belt assembly, with multiple part numbers, including 636655200 and 639430300.  This is the second recall by Tata Motors because of this issue, caused by faulty parts supplied by Swedish-American manufacturer Autoliv.

Recall summary  

The problem stems from a faulty seat belt mechanism. There are two ways to secure a child car seat in a vehicle, and one is to utilize the seat belt, using retractors, which are parts used to hold it in place.

The retractor that secures a child seat is called the automatic locking retractor (ALR). It locks once “the continuous motion of spooling the belt out is stopped.”

Due to a supplier manufacturing issue, the ALR may deactivate and allow the seat belt to become loose, potentially allowing the child seat to move around.

Recall risks

According to research conducted by the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA), car seats reduce deaths by 71% for infants under one year old, and by 54% for kids between one and four. In 2017 alone, car seats saved an estimated 312 lives among children under the age of five. 

If car seats are not tightly secured, they will not offer this level of protection. The defective Jaguar seat belt poses “an increased risk of injury in a crash” to a child in a car seat, according to the recall document.

Safety tips

Jaguar Land Rover has not yet released any instructions for owners on how to protect child passengers from this defect. The supplier did say the defect does not affect child car seats secured using anchors and tethers (e.g., “LATCH system”) on the seat. Find out which car seats use anchors and tethers in this article.

Warning signs 

Jaguar Land Rover also did not detail any warning signs that indicate a faulty seat belt. However, documents for an identical recall by Mercedes-Benz have reported an “audible clicking noise” drivers may hear when the seat belt is locked. If the clicking noise stops before the seat belt is fully retracted, the seat belt may be faulty.

The repair

Affected seat belts will be replaced free of charge by Jaguar dealers. Owners should receive letters with more information on October 22, 2201

Other Jaguar recalls

Earlier this month, Tata recalled 28,000 Land Rover SUVs affected by the same issue. Over 7,000 Land Rover Defenders were recalled in the same month because of  incorrect child restraint information in the owner’s manual, as reported. In March, there was also a Jaguar recall for defective high beams involving over 26,000 vehicles. 

Is your vehicle part of this recall?

A total of 9,000 vehicles are included in this Jaguar recall. To see if your car is one of them, use MotorSafety’s free vehicle lookup tool.

Rebecca RandNew Jaguars recalled over unsecured child car seats

Multiple Land Rover SUVs recalled over unsecured child seats

Mahwah, NJ – September 23, 2021 – Tata Motoros (NYSE:TTM) – which owns Jaguar Land Rover – has issued a recall for 28,000 Land Rover SUVs over a faulty seat belt locking system that may not securely hold a child car seat. This may increase the risk that a child is injured in the event of an accident.

The list of vehicles includes multiple newer models:

  • 2021 Range Rover
  • 2022 Range Rover Sport
  • 2020-2021 Land Rover Range Rover Velar
  • 2020-2022 Land Rover Defender
  • 2020-2022 Land Rover Discovery
  • 2020-2021 Land Rover Discovery Sport

The affected component is the “seat belt” with multiple part numbers, including 624451800 and

Recall summary

Retractors, as reported, hold seat belts in place in two different ways. There is a retractor that locks in the seat belt if there is a crash and one that does that as soon as the seat belt is buckled. The latter, called the automatic locking retractor (ALR), is at the center of this recall, because it may deactivate and cause the seat belt to come loose.

Background of the recall

The issue is a result of faulty parts provided by Swedish-American supplier Autoliv, as reported.  A total of 266,772 seat belts have been affected and multiple manufacturers, including Daimler, Ford and BMW have been affected. You can read more about this recall in this article.

Recall risks

If the ALR does not function properly, the seat belt may come loose and cause the child seat to move around. This can result in injury to the child in the restraint seat in the event of a crash. 

The risk is eliminated if instead of using the seat belts, parents use the so-called lower anchors and tethers for children (LATCH) system.

Other Land Rover and Range Rover recalls

Another related Jaguar Land Rover recall recently had incorrect child restraint information in the owner’s manual. Back in March 2021, Land Rover issued a recall for multiple newer model year vehicles for defective high beams, which included the 2020 Land Rover Discovery and 2020 Range Rover Velar.

The repair

Potentially affected owners will be notified and asked to take their cars to the nearest Land Rover dealership. If the vehicle has a seat belt with a part number that is under recall, it will be replaced, free of charge. 

Customers will be notified on October 22, 2021.

Is your vehicle part of the recall?

To find out if your vehicle is a part of this Land Rover recall, use MotorSafety’s free vehicle lookup tool.

Vishal VenugopalMultiple Land Rover SUVs recalled over unsecured child seats

Jaguar Land Rover recalls vehicles due to incorrect child restraint information

Mahwah, NJ – September 6, 2021 – Jaguar Land Rover (NYSE:TTM) has announced a recall for 7,027 vehicles due to incorrect information in the owner’s regarding the third-row seats’ child restraint system. The information may lead to a child being “improperly secured,” increasing the risk of injury in a crash.

The Jaguar recall includes the following vehicles:

  • 2020 Land Rover Defender
  • 2021 Land Rover Defender

Summary

The owner manual of the recall vehicles incorrectly states that the third-row seats are equipped with the so-called lower anchors and tethers for children (LATCH) system “with top tethers.” The system allows parents to secure children with “straps and hooks..and anchor hardware” in place of seat belts.

Risks

This lack of correct information about these Land Rover child seat anchors may lead to the children being “improperly secured,” augmenting the risk of injury in the event of a crash.

There have been no reported injuries from this recall at this time and parents can still use seat belts to secure their children in these seats.

Other Jaguar recalls

Earlier this month, 111,746 Land Rover LR4 and Range Rover Sport cars were recalled because of a potential fuel leak that can lead to a car fire, as reported. In March 2021, 26,805 Land Rover SUVs were recalled for a faulty Auto High Beam (AHB) system. 

Repair

Owners will be mailed a supplement to insert into their current handbook free of charge on September 24, 2021.

Is your vehicle part of this recall? 

An estimated 4,917 vehicles are part of this Land Rover recall. To do a Jaguar recall check,  use MotorSafety’s free vehicle lookup tool.

Mikaela BolkerJaguar Land Rover recalls vehicles due to incorrect child restraint information

Jaguar recalls SUVs for defective high beams

Dearborn, MI – March 16, 2021 – Jaguar Land Rover (NYSE:TTM) has recalled 26,805 sports utility vehicles due to a faulty Auto High Beam (AHB) system. The high beams light up on their own, increasing the risk of a crash. The recall includes the following compact SUVs:

  • Land Rover Discovery 2020
  • Land Rover Discovery 2018 – 2019 
  • Range Rover 2018 – 2020
  • Range Rover Sport 2018 – 2020
  • Range Rover Velar 2018 – 2019
  • Range Rover Velar 2020

Recall summary 

The above mentioned vehicles have a faulty Auto High Beam (AHB) system. The beams light up without the driver’s input and the instrument cluster does not provide any indication that they are on. The cause of the defect is software, with multiple part numbers, including JY32-14C088-JL and KY32-14C088-JG.

Safety risks

During nighttime, the faulty lights may blind oncoming drivers, upping the risk of an accident, which can injure or kill the motorists and passengers involved.

Other Jaguar Land Rover recalls

In July 2019, a “seat belt locking glitch” forced Jaguar to recall the Range Rover Sport 2018 and  Range Rover Sport 2019.  The driver and passengers could not properly fasten their seat belts, increasing the risk of an injury during an accident.

The 2020 Velar has not been subject to any other recalls.

Repair

Dealers will fix the issue by providing a free software update. The recall starts on April 23.

Is your vehicle part of this recall?

Close to 27,000 sports utility vehicles will be included in this Jaguar Land Rover recall.  Use the MotorSafety’s free vehicle lookup tool to check if your vehicle is a part of this recall.

Suhas RamachandraJaguar recalls SUVs for defective high beams

Range Rover Sport recalled for tire pressure issue

Pleasanton, CA – September 24, 2020 – Tata Motors Limited (NYSE:TTM) has recalled 11,159 Range Rover Sport vehicles that do not properly warn the driver when the tire pressure is low. Low tire pressure may cause tread separation and increase the risk of a crash. The recall includes 2020-2021 Range Rover Sport vehicles.

Recall summary  

Range Rover Sport vehicles with 20-inch, 21-inch, or 22-inch wheels have a faulty Tire Pressure Monitoring System (TPMS). Here is how the monitoring system should work:

  • Each tire manufacturer lists an inflation pressure level that should be maintained in the tire.
  • When the tire pressure reaches 25% below the recommended pressure level, the TMPS warning light should come on in the instrument panel.
  • This light alerts the driver to check the tire pressure and inflate the tire to the proper minimum level.

In recalled vehicles, the tire pressure level has not been set correctly in the instrument cluster. Drivers are not notified when a tire’s pressure is too low for safe driving.

Risks 

Underinflated tires are a common problem that reduce fuel economy and can become dangerous if the tire tread  – which is the rubber part of the tire that makes contact with the road – separates  from the body of the tire.  The separation can cause a tire blowout, which can result in the driver losing control of the car and crashing, especially when moving at high speeds. Tire-related crashes killed over 700 people in 2017, according to the National Highway Safety Administration (NHTSA).

What to do in the event of a blowout

As the tire bursts, the driver may hear a loud boom and be pulled to one side. 

Here is what to do if it happens:

  • Maintain composure. Don’t try to suddenly break, turn or pull over. Any of these actions can cause the car to spin out of control.
  • Turn your emergency lights on.
  • Try to regain control by gently stepping on the gas and steering straight.
  • Once you feel you have more control, let go of gas and let the car slow down.
  • Once the speed drops below 30 mph, pump the brakes and try to pull over.
  • Call for help.

The repair

To fix the issue, dealers will need to update the instrument cluster software, so that the TPMS operates correctly. Land Rover will notify owners by November 13  but it is not clear if the update will be available by then.

Is your vehicle part of this recall?

Over 11,000 vehicles are included in this Range Rover Sport recall. To see if your vehicle is one of them, use MotorSafety’s free vehicle identification number (VIN) look up tool.

Ken BoydRange Rover Sport recalled for tire pressure issue

Land Rover recalls Range Rover Sport SUVs for fly-away spoilers

Pleasanton, CA – October 8, 2020 – Jaguar Land Rover (NYSE:TTM) has recalled 21,834 luxury SUVs whose spoilers may detach from the car while driving, creating the risk of a crash. The recall includes 2010-2011 Range Rover Sport SUVs.

Recall summary  

The glue that attaches the spoilers to the car may not hold over time, resulting in the spoilers loosening and potentially falling off while driving at high speeds.

The recall was reluctantly initiated by the manufacturer after consumers in the U.S. logged 132 fly-away spoiler complaints and a recall for the same vehicle and issue was initiated in Japan. The complaints prompted the NHTSA to open an investigation in May.  

In September, Land Rover concluded that there was “limited evidence of a safety defect pattern”  but agreed to issue a  recall to “maintain good relations” with the NHTSA.

Risks

Fly-away spoilers could become an obstacle in the roadway, forcing drivers to make quick maneuvers that could result in a crash.

In fact, leading up to the NHTSA investigation, consumers logged three complaints about spoilers breaking windshields, six about spoilers striking vehicles behind them and four about drivers behind them having to swerve to avoid the detached spoiler in the road.

Road debris’ crash statistics

Between 2011 and 2014, road debris played a role  in around 200,000 crashes  and caused close to 40,000 injuries and 500 deaths, according to a study by the AAA Foundation for Traffic Safety.  Over 75,000 of those crashes were caused by debris flying off of one vehicle and striking another.  

The repair

Owners will be able to take their SUVs to a Land Rover dealer, who will apply a stronger glue to the spoiler. Drivers who already paid to have their spoilers re-attached may be able to be reimbursed.  The recall begins on NovembeR 30.

Is your vehicle part of this recall?

Over 21,000 vehicles are included in this Land Rover recall. To see if your car is one of them, use MotorSafety’s free vehicle lookup tool.

Rebecca RandLand Rover recalls Range Rover Sport SUVs for fly-away spoilers

Land Rover vehicles recalled for faulty door latches

Pleasanton, CA – July 2 2020 – Tata Motors (NYSE:TTM) has recalled 6,211 Range Rover vehicles with door latches that are not properly closing. The door latches may open when the car is moving, increasing the risk of a crash. The recall includes:

  • 2013-2016 Range Rover vehicles
  • 2014-2016 Range Rover Sport vehicles

Recall summary  

On July 9, Tata’s subsidiary Jaguar Land Rover North America determined that certain Range Rover models should be recalled to repair door latches. This follows on the heels of another recall for the same issue last year. The recall did not fully address the problem.

The culprit of the recall is the Keyless Vehicle Latching System (KV Latch), which allows entry to the vehicle without a key. After using the system, the doors may appear fully shut while in fact being unlatched. This may lead to the doors opening while the vehicle is in motion. 

Risks 

It is very risky to have a door open while the car is in motion. The occupants may fall out of the car; you could hit a nearby cyclist or be hit by another vehicle.  It is not a minor problem either – falls from cars, for example, caused 75,000 injuries between 2011 and 2012.

The repair

The dealer will disable the KV latch system and install a software update.  The latch system may be reactivated if, after the software update, it is determined that it is functioning properly.

The first repair should take between 20 minutes to 3.5 hours, depending on the number door latches that must be repaired. Owners have been notified of the recall and the repair is free of charge.

Is your vehicle part of this recall?

Over 6,200 vehicles are included in this Range Rover recall. To see if your car is one of them, use MotorSafety’s free vehicle lookup tool.

Ken BoydLand Rover vehicles recalled for faulty door latches

Brace Bracket Design Flaw Results In Jaguar Recall

Laguna Hills, CA – Aug. 28, 2019 – A small-scale recall is underway at Jaguar Land Rover North America, as a few dozen 2018 E-Pace models may contain compromised brake systems that could lead to leakages in brake fluid. Braking system failure could dramatically increase the risk of an accident and resulting injury.

Motorists affected by this recall should have already received their notifications from the automaker. If you think you may be affected by the 2018 Jaguar E-Pace recall but aren’t certain, contact your dealer.

The Defect

According to documents filed with the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, approximately 41 2018 Jaguar E-Pace crossover sport utility vehicles are under recall notice because certain automobiles may contain installed brake brace brackets that are not in line with the manufacturer’s design specifications. As a result, the poor fitting may allow the front brake hoses to come into contact with the tires, which increases the chances that brake fuel may leak out.

Without the proper amount of lubrication fluid, the brakes may increase chafing and take longer for the vehicle to come to a complete stop when the operator engages the pedal. This could potentially result in a crash and occurrence of injury.

Timeline of Events

This problem first came to light back in December 2017, when Jaguar’s product safety and compliance committee was alerted to the issue, which affected shipment of the models to dealerships. This forced Jaguar to reach out to dealers later that month, advising them to cease and desist selling any additional E-Pace vehicles, whose VINs all fell within a certain range. 

Safety testing was carried out two months later to see what, if any, consequences resulted from motorists using models with the improper brake brace brackets. The results showed that in a worst-case scenario, the brake flexi hose could come into contact with the tires when the full steering lock was applied. Jaguar’s recall determination committee decided in February that the potential for this issue to occur was high enough to warrant a recall, and subsequently informed NHTSA.

No accidents, fires or injuries related to the 2018 Jaguar E-Pace recall have been reported to either the NHTSA or the automaker.

There haven’t been too many Jaguar Land Rover safety recalls over the past year, but several affect more recently built models. For example, approximately 8,200 2018 Discovery Sport SUV were pulled from the marketplace in the early portion of the same year over defective fuel rail assemblies. The automaker determined that the offending end caps may not seal properly. A resultant leak could ultimately lead to an engine fire.

Meanwhile, Jaguar also recalled 3,083 2019-2020 I-Pace SUVs for potentially flawed regenerative brakes. A system failure would increase the amount of time needed for the vehicle to slow down once the brake pedal is engaged. Owners began to be informed of this issue by first-class mail July 1.

The Solution

Those that have received an alert pertaining to the 2018 Jaguar E-Pace recall are strongly urged to take their automobile to an area dealership so the brake flexi hose bracket can be more closely examined. If the problem exists, the issue will be corrected free of charge.

For more information on this or any other vehicle safety recall, visit MotorSafety.org.

Sean ReyesBrace Bracket Design Flaw Results In Jaguar Recall