Volkswagen recalls Audi cars with Takata airbags

The new Takata air bag recall includes shrapnel

  • Audi 2000-2001 TT Roadster, 2000 TT Coupe, 1999 Audi A8, 1998-2000 Audi A6, and 1999-2000 Audi A4 vehicles are under recall
  • Takata has recalled 1.4 million air bag inflators that may expel shrapnel
  • 107,000 older Audi luxury vehicles are under this recent recall

Laguna Hills, CA – Feb 6, 2020 – The recent Takata airbag recall forced Volkswagen to act. Volkswagen is notifying Audi owners that their vehicles may not be as safe as they thought.

In December, Takata recalled 1.4 million air bag inflators. This recall came about because when the air bags inflate following a car accident, they can do so with an excessive amount of force.

This causes a metal canister to explode and metal fragments may fly out, potentially harming a vehicle’s occupants. The risk is a significant consideration for Audi owners due to the exploding factor.

An ongoing problem

According to reports, Takata has been aware of its airbag risk since 2014. Because of this, airbag recalls have been occurring for years. Some vehicles are at a higher exploding risk.

These include Honda and Acura vehicles from 1996 to 2000. In March 2019, the driver of a 2002 Honda Civic died in the hospital following a crash that initiated the rupturing of the airbag and injured the driver.

Deaths and injuries worldwide

It is suspected that Takata inflators have caused about 25 deaths and 300 injuries throughout the world.

In the United States, more than 50 million Takata inflators are in recall status, resulting in the most vehicle recalls in the country’s history. The problem has been so big and impactful that it forced the airbag company into bankruptcy.

When can owners expect notification?

On October 21, 2019, German car manufacturer Volkswagen, Audi’s parent company, received reports from suppliers about issues with NADI inflators found during field tests.

Audi’s safety board was notified a few weeks later in November, and talks with the supplier commenced.

After confirming the risk, Audi notified the US National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) of the risk and the findings of their investigation so far, and Audi began an analysis of retrieved parts from the German and international markets in early January 2020.

Simultaneously, Takata sent out a defect report detailing the issues with the NADI inflators and the danger they posed. Audi independently verified the risk on January 22, 2020, when their own test results showed that there was indeed a risk of slow or no airbag deployment.

Repair

Volkswagen is recalling all vehicles that have the faulty airbag to prevent the owners and occupants of their vehicles from harm. Replacement parts are not yet available.

In recall documents, Volkswagen told NHTSA, “At this point, due to the age of the vehicles, a repair is not available. Audi is working intensively on a remedy with the supplier, but currently it is unclear when the remedy will be available.” 

When can owners expect notification?

This round of Audi recalls started March 27, 2020. Those affected by the recall should have been notified or will be soon. Audi owners will receive a second notification when the parts are available. In some cases, both the driver’s airbag and the passenger front airbags are at risk.

Volkswagen wasn’t the first to issue a recall

BMW recalled 357,000 older automobiles back in January. This recall includes an estimated 293,000 BMW 3-Series from the year 2000 to 2006 as well as approximately 60,000 3 Series and 1 Series BMWs from 2006 to 2012. Some of the automaker’s SUVs were also equipped with the faulty airbags.

Is your vehicle part of the recall?

Nearly 107,000 cars are part of this Audi recall.  As of March 29, 2021, repairs were still not available.

To check back on the repair status, bookmark MotorSafety’s free lookup tool.

Note: June 8, 2021

We have noticed a large number of readers are interested in this recall. For that reason, we have edited the article to reflect that the parts are not yet available and to add Volkswagen’s statement pertaining to this fact.

Joe GlaserVolkswagen recalls Audi cars with Takata airbags

BMW recalls 1999-2001 vehicles with deadly Takata airbags

Laguna Hills, CA – November 26, 2019 -– BMW is recalling 74,185 vehicles equipped with deadly Takata-manufactured Non-Azide Driver airbag Inflators (NADI). The recall includes the following cars:

  • 1999 – 2001 323i, 325i, 328i and 330i
  • 2000 – 2001 323Ci, 325Ci, 328Ci, 330Ci, 323iT, and 325iT 

As of the date of the recall, one person was killed and another injured as a result of this defect. Therefore, it is important that you take your vehicle in for repair immediately. Use MotorSafety’s free lookup tool to see if your car is part of this recall.

The defect

BMW states that these specific units may have received replacement airbags as part of a vehicle repair. Due to a manufacturing issue, the replacement NADI inflator can absorb moisture, causing the airbag to rupture or underinflate.

All listed vehicles may have had these devices installed during repairs. In the event of a crash, a rupture of the inflator can result in dangerous metal fragments hitting drivers and passengers, while an underinflated airbag can fail to shield the occupants properly.

These issues increase the risk of severe injury or death. BMW has not provided any guidance on how to ascertain if a vehicle possesses the defective NADI inflators.

Owners should exercise caution; a solution is not yet available at this time, and BMW recommends that owners should not utilize their vehicles until safe removal processes are available.

Timeline of events

On November 26, 2019, manufacturer Takata (TK Global LLC) disclosed that some of their NADI inflators produced from 1995 – 2000 were defective and issued a recall for all known extant units and vehicles that may contain said units.

Later that day, BMW issued a recall for several different classes of vehicle, gradually adding more to the list by the end of the day. BMW North America is currently the only automobile manufacturer to have issued a recall relating to these defective Takata NADI inflators.

Recommending that owners do not currently drive their vehicles, BMW is sending interim notices about the risk to owners until January 17, and again when the remedy becomes available.

The solution

Dealers will inspect the cars and replace the defective airbags free of charge. Owners were last notified on November 20, 2020.

Is your vehicle part of this recall?

Over 74,000 cars were originally part of this recall. As of April 30, 2021, only 4,162 airbags had been replaced. To see if your car still needs to be serviced, please use MotorSafety’s free lookup tool.

We have noticed a large number of readers are interested in this recall. For that reason, we have updated the article to reflect the latest editorial standards; provided the most-up-to-date information in the “Solution” section and added the last section where drivers can check if their vehicle is part of this recall. To the best of our knowledge, the cars in this recall are not on the “Do not drive” list. However, out of the abundance of caution, we are keeping the original author’s recommendation NOT to drive these vehicles before they are repaired. Please contact support@motorsafety.org with any questions.

Sean ReyesBMW recalls 1999-2001 vehicles with deadly Takata airbags

GM Recalls More Than 1,000 Chevy Malibus for Air Bag Defects

Detroit – January 31, 2022 – General Motors (NYSE:GM) has remedied issues with 459 2010-2011 Chevy Malibu vehicles for a potential defect that may cause the driver’s frontal airbag inflator to explode. Additionally, 52 of these vehicles have been categorized as unreachable, and 53 have been removed from the recall. These 2010-2011 Chevrolet Malibu models were remedied in 2 different years, four groups in 2019 and three groups were remedied in 2020 by having these driver airbag issues.

Detroit – January 31, 2019 General Motors is recalling certain 2010-2011 Chevrolet Malibu vehicles, due to a potentially dangerous airbag defect. Up to 1,145 units may be affected by this issue.

The defect

According to the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration Safety Report, in the event of a crash necessitating deployment of the driver’s frontal airbag, the airbag inflator in these cars may explode due to being over-pressurized.

If the inflator explodes, sharp metal fragments may strike the driver or other occupants, resulting in serious injury or death.

Timeline of events

On November 30, 2017, an attorney contacted GM and claimed that on September 22, 2017, the front-driver airbag inflator in a 2011 Chevrolet Malibu ruptured during a crash-related deployment and injured his client.

GM reported the allegation to NHTSA on December 6 of the same year in accordance with Standing General Orders 2015-01 and 2015-02.

Between November 30, 2017, and December 13, 2018, GM made multiple attempts to locate and inspect the vehicle to confirm whether or not a rupture had occurred.

A GM engineer was permitted to inspect the vehicle and components. Based on that examination, GM determined that the front-driver airbag inflator in the subject vehicle likely over-pressurized and ruptured during deployment.’’

On December 19, 2018, GM presented the inspection photos and the other findings of its preliminary analysis to the NHTSA. On December 20, 2018, GM’s Safety Field Action Decision Authority (SFADA) decided to conduct a safety recall on the ARC inflators built in the suspect manufacturing lot.

At the time of the initial filing, GM was not aware of other rupture allegations involving this ARC inflator in GM vehicles.

On December 29, 2016, GM recalled certain 2017 Chevrolet Malibu vehicles due to airbag inflator defects. This recall is part of the larger Takata airbag inflators recall. These problems were similar to the reasons that led to a recent recall of 2016 Malibu vehicles.

The solution

GM has notified owners of these potentially problematic vehicles, and dealers will replace the front driver airbag module for free. Interim notices informing owners of the safety risk were mailed on February 8, 2019.

Owners will receive a second notice when the remedy becomes available, which is expected to be in late March 2019. GM’s number for this recall is N182206630.

The NHTSA Campaign Number for this recall is 19V-019000.

To find out if your vehicle is part of this recall, use MotorSafety.org’s free vehicle recall lookup tool.

Sean ReyesGM Recalls More Than 1,000 Chevy Malibus for Air Bag Defects