Hyundai and Kia Recall 500,000 Cars Over Faulty Brake Light

The Drive  – December 14, 2017

Hyundai and Kia Recall 500,000 Cars Over Faulty Brake Light

Hyundai and Kia are recalling a total of approximately half a million compact cars over a brake light issue. Specifically, the recall affects 363,932 Hyundai Elantras from model years 2013-2014 and 134,366 Kia Fortes (Koup variety included) from model years 2012-2014.
According to the NHTSA filings, the foible lies with a brake pedal stopper pad that when worn out enough is at risk of leaving the brake lights lit after the driver has taken their foot off the pedal. Afflicted brake pedal assemblies may also trigger the traction control dash light, allow the driver to move the car’s shift lever without their foot on the brake, or inadvertently activate the electronic brake override…

Read the entire article on The Drive website

Sean ReyesHyundai and Kia Recall 500,000 Cars Over Faulty Brake Light

Hyundai recalls vehicles with defective seat belts [Video]

Hello, and welcome to another vehicle recall update.

Hyundai Motor America has recalled more than four-hundred and forty-three thousand vehicles possibly equipped with defective seat belt assemblies. The campaign affects 2011-2014 Hyundai Sonata and 2011-2015 Hyundai Sonata Hybrid sport utility vehicles.

These models feature front seat belt assemblies with pretensioner components that may not fasten properly, posing a serious safety hazard to occupants.

Hyundai has directed dealers to inspect and, if necessary, repair the pretensioner parts in these models. The automaker will reimburse owners for any required work. Individuals affected by this recall should have received notification via first-class mail on or around October twelfth, two-thousand and seventeen.

Stay tuned for more vehicle recall breaking news.

adminHyundai recalls vehicles with defective seat belts [Video]

Hyundai recalls vehicles with defective crankshafts

Fountain Valley, Calif. – Oct. 13, 2017 – Hyundai Motor America has recalled more than 400 vehicles potentially equipped with defective crankshaft assemblies, according to documentation submitted to the National Transportation Safety Administration. The campaign affects 2017 Santa Fe sport utility vehicles with production dates ranging from Jan. 26, 2017 to Feb. 13, 2017. HMA estimates that 25 percent of the models named in the recall actually contain the defective parts.

The Defect

Affected vehicles could contain crankshaft assemblies featuring crankshaft pins with surface irregularities. These components may lead to premature engine bearing degradation and damage. In the event that the engine bearing becomes overly worn or flawed during operation, the vehicle could stall suddenly. This increases the likelihood of an accident and consequently poses a serious risk to occupants. That said, HMA has yet to receive field reports connecting the defective crankshaft assemblies to any accidents or injuries.

Owners operating vehicles containing the problematic parts may hear abnormal engine noises, experience reduced motive power or see the check-engine or oil-pressure warning lamps illuminate.

Timeline of Events

On May 2, 2017, HMA received a field report that described a situation in which a customer heard a knocking sound while operating his Santa Fe. HMA personnel recovered the engine from the SUV for further evaluation soon after. Engineers at the Hyundai North American Quality Center in Chino, California launched an investigation into the component. Meanwhile, HMA kept an eye on the market over the course of June, July and August in an effort to pinpoint additional occurrences of knocking. The Korean automaker gathered three field reports mentioning abnormal engine noise over this span, all of which involved Santa Fe models. Additionally, one of these reports outline an instance of sudden engine failure. On Aug. 7, HMA started recovering the engines from the vehicles in these reports.

Later that month, HMA engineers reviewed these parts, in addition to the engine from the original report. They found that all four engines showed signs of bearing seizure, a condition linked to crankshaft pins with significant surface irregularities. The car company discovered that these components were the result of ineffective production processes. Specifically, staff at the Hyundai Motor Company Asan Plant in Korea had failed to fabricate the crankshaft assemblies using proper heat treatment, a result of skewed heating coils. The facility amended its processes and corrected the problem during a tool maintenance session in January 2017.

On Sept. 13, the HMA Technical Committee met to analyze the results of the investigation into the crankshaft pins and determined that the potential operating outcomes, most notably sudden engine stalling, posed a serious threat to occupants. The group then ultimately decided to conduct a voluntary safety recall.

HMA notified dealers Sept. 27.

The Solution

The car company has directed dealers to inspect and, if necessary, replace the engines in affected vehicles free of charge, according to the NHTSA. HMA plans to notify owners via first-class mail Oct. 18. Owners in need of more immediate assistance can reach out to Hyundai customer service personnel at (855) 371-9460. Callers should use the internal recall identification number 168. Owners can also connect with the NHTSA directly through its Vehicle Safety Hotline at (888) 327-4236.

Recall MastersHyundai recalls vehicles with defective crankshafts

Hyundai recalls vehicles with defective suspension components

Fountain Valley, Calif. – Oct. 11, 2017 – Hyundai Motor America has recalled nearly 200 vehicles believed to contain defective front coil springs, according to documentation filed with the National Transportation Safety Administration. The campaign affects 2018 Hyundai Santa Fe Sport sport utility vehicles with production dates ranging from Aug. 25, 2017 to Sept. 6, 2017. The Korean automaker is unsure exactly how many of the models referenced in the recall actually come equipped with the defective features.

The Defect

Affected vehicles may include front coil springs prone to fracture under heavy loads. In some instances, these features can extrude from the chassis and come into contact with – and puncture – vehicle tires. This increases the likelihood of an accident and therefore poses a serious threat to occupants. However, HMA has not received any reports connecting the defect to any accidents or injuries.

Drivers who experience coil spring fracture normally see a notable change in ride height and hear the abnormal noise created when the spring rubs against the inboard tire sidewall.

Timeline of Events

In early September 2017, Hyundai engineers conducting routine test drives at the Hyundai Motor Manufacturing Alabama facility in Montgomery operated two vehicles that suffered coil spring fractures mid-drive. Quality assurance staff at the plant notified HMA officials via a Sept. 5 internal report. Upon receiving this documentation, the automaker reviewed records to search for customer complaints referencing the problem – none were found. However, HMA did pinpoint approximately 1,700 vehicles originating from the assembly plant in Montgomery that could include the defective coil springs.

The automaker determined that approximately 196 of these models had been shipped to dealers. It also learned, via an internal investigation, that the defective coils installed in these SUVs were the result of ineffective production processes involving malfunctioning coil spring forming equipment.

The Mando Corporation, based in Opelika, Alabama, oversaw the operation that produced the defective parts. The parts provider repaired its coil-forming tool to prevent the production of additional defective features. It launched the overhauled equipment since Sept. 6.

On Sept. 13, the HMA Technical Committee convened to review all information collected on the fracture-prone coil springs and eventually decided to conduct a voluntary safety recall. The automaker notified dealers and owners Sept. 27.

The Solution

HMA has directed dealers to replace the coil springs in affected vehicles free of charge, according to a recall acknowledgment document from the NHTSA. Owners should have received notification via first-class mail. Those who have not or need additional assistance can contact HMA customer service at (855) 371-9460. Callers should reference the internal recall identification number 167. Owners can also reach out to the NHTSA using its Vehicle Safety Hotline at (888) 327-4236.

Recall MastersHyundai recalls vehicles with defective suspension components

Hyundai recalls model year 2018 Santa Fe Sport vehicles

Consumer News – October 9, 2017

Mitsubishi recalls Lancer again for Takata inflator

https://www.consumeraffairs.com/news/hyundai-recalls-model-year-2018-santa-fe-sport-vehicles-100917.html
Hyundai Motor America is recalling 197 model year 2018 Santa Fe Sport vehicles.
The front coil springs may have been improperly manufactured and, as a result, may fracture under certain loads while the vehicle is being driven
A coil spring fracture can puncture the tire, causing a loss of vehicle control and increasing the risk of a crash.
What to do
The affected vehicles are currently unsold on dealer lots. Dealers will replace both front coil springs, free of charge prior to the vehicle’s sale…

Read the entire article on the Automotive News website

Sean ReyesHyundai recalls model year 2018 Santa Fe Sport vehicles

Hyundai recalls electric models with EPCU problems

 

Fountain Valley, Calif. – Sept. 20, 2017 – Hyundai Motor America has recalled more than 200 vehicles believed to contain defective electronic power control units, according to documentation submitted to the National Highway Transportation Safety Administration. The campaign affects 2017 Hyundai Ioniq plug-in electric sedans with production dates ranging from Nov. 17, 2016 to March 30, 2017. Hyundai suspects just 2 percent of the vehicles named in the recall contain the defective fixtures.

The Defect

Hyundai Ioniq sedans are equipped with aluminum-encased EPCU devices that transform alternating current power into direct current power for charging the battery system. The vehicles named in the campaign could contain EPCU devices whose aluminum shells feature small voids that allow coolant to leak onto EPCU circuit boards, leading to stalling. These cracked casings increase the likelihood of an accident – especially at high speeds – and therefore poses a serious danger to occupants. However, Hyundai has not received reports connecting the problematic EPCU coverings to any accidents or injuries.

Timeline of Events

In June 2017, the South Korean automaker received a field report outlining an instance in which an Ioniq owner was forced to tow his vehicle to a dealer after it stalled on the road. In this instance, the “check electrical vehicle system” light illuminated. Hyundai received another field report later in the month describing a similar situation.

In July, the car company collected parts from both vehicles and delivered them to engineering staff for evaluation. Personnel immediately spotted the cracked EPCU casings and diagnosed the root cause of both breakdowns. Hyundai then contacted the Korea-based parts provider responsible for delivering the defective aluminum fixtures. The company, Hyundai Mobis, traced the defective EPCU coverings to a manufacturing process revision made in April 2017. Hyundai quality assurance personnel reviewed all the available information related to the cracked EPCU housings and decided conduct a voluntary safety recall Aug. 17.

The car company notified owners of the action Sept. 1.

The Solution

Hyundai has directed dealers to inspect and replace the EPCU units in affected vehicles free of charge, according to a recall acknowledgement document from the NHTSA. The automaker plans to notify owners via first-class mail Sept. 29. Those in need of more immediate assistance can contact Hyundai customer service at (800) 633-5151. Callers should use the internal recall identification code 166. Owners can also reach out the NHTSA directly via its Vehicle Safety Hotline at (888) 327-4236.

adminHyundai recalls electric models with EPCU problems

2017 Hyundai Ioniq Electric: Recall Alert

Cars.com – September 19, 2017

2017 Hyundai Ioniq Electric: Recall Alert

Vehicles Affected: Approximately 218 model-year 2017 Hyundai Ioniq Electric hatchbacks
The Problem: Manufacturing defects within the electric power control unit may allow coolant to contact the unit’s circuit board, causing a stall and increasing the risk of a crash.
The Fix: Dealers will inspect and replace the EPCU, as necessary, for free.
What Owners Should Do: Hyundai will begin notifying owners Sept. 29. Owners can call the automaker at 800-633-5151, the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration’s vehicle-safety hotline at 888-327-4236 or visit www.safercar.gov to check their vehicle identification number and learn more…

Read the entire article on the Cars.com website

Sean Reyes2017 Hyundai Ioniq Electric: Recall Alert

Hyundai recalls vehicles for parking brake indicator issue [Video]

Fountain Valley, Calif.—June 9, 2017—In one of a pair of Hyundai recalls, the manufacturer is taking action on vehicles with possible warning light issues for their parking brakes. This recall concerns more than 161 vehicles, with 1 percent estimated to have the defect .

If the electrical switches in these vehicles corrode, then the parking brake light could fail to display at the right times. Some of the signs of this issue are noise, smoke or extra resistance from the parking brake.

Owner notification was set for June 30. Dealers will fix the problem by replacing the parking switch with a new one made of different material. As of June 5, the manufacturer was not aware of any accidents due to this defect.

Stay tuned for more recall updates.

adminHyundai recalls vehicles for parking brake indicator issue [Video]

New Hyundai recall to address faulty hood latches

 

Fountain Valley, Calif.—June 9, 2017—In a much-publicized recall, Hyundai launched an effort to address possible latch issues in two models: the Santa Fe and Santa Fe Sport. The model year ranges for these vehicles are the same, spanning 2013 to 2017. This was part of a pair of recent Hyundai recalls for different causes, and was the larger of the two unrelated actions.

The Defect

A recall acknowledgement statement from the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration said that 437,400 units were potentially affected. The secondary hood latch in these vehicles could stay unlatched even after the hood is closed, depending on whether or not the actuating cable corrodes and binds. The risk comes from whether or not the hood would then open during travel, as it could potentially do.

The Resolution

The same statement said the manufacturer report date for this recall was June 5, with the recall itself expected to begin on June 30 as of that statement. To fix these affected vehicles, dealers will replace the latch.

The other recent Hyundai recall also concerned corrosion, although this separate case applied to a parking brake warning light switch that could deteriorate and cause potential safety concerns and confusion, as The Car Connection reported.

In 2016, Hyundai also oversaw a recall about hood latches. In a statement about recall campaign details for that action, the manufacturer said that dealer principals and other manager-level staff should inform customers to inspect the latch and hood before driving, and that interim repairs made to the affected vehicles did not indicate that the finished recall repairs were done.

That recall announcement came in June as well, with the recall itself continuing into the July of that year. The solution to that recall also involved dealers replacing the faulty hood latches.

adminNew Hyundai recall to address faulty hood latches

Hyundai recalls 600,000 U.S. vehicles: Genesis, Sonata, Santa Fe, Santa Fe Sport

The Car Connection – June 8, 2017


Hyundai recalls 600,000 U.S. vehicles: Genesis, Sonata, Santa Fe, Santa Fe Sport

The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration published two large recalls from Hyundai this morning. Combined, they affect nearly 600,000 vehicles registered in the U.S.

RECALL #1: 2013-2017 Hyundai Santa Fe, Santa Fe Sport
UNITS AFFECTED: 437,400

This recall is the result of a problem with the secondary hood latch (something of a recurring problem with Hyundai vehicles this past year). NHTSA says that the actuator cable associated with that latch “may corrode and bind,” and as a result, the secondary latch might remain in the open position when the hood is closed.

If that should happen, and if the primary hood latch should fail, the hood could open. Obviously, if that were to happen while the vehicle was in motion, it would dramatically boost the risk of an accident.

Hyundai says that it will mail recall notices to owners by June 30. After receiving those notices, owners will be able to schedule service with their local Hyundai dealers, who will replace the secondary latch cable at no charge…

Read the entire article on the Car Connection website

Sean ReyesHyundai recalls 600,000 U.S. vehicles: Genesis, Sonata, Santa Fe, Santa Fe Sport